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By Raffy Paredes

A giant cache of historical photographs from over 50 European archives covering the first 100 years of photography is now part of a searchable online database. The new resource, Europeana Photography, is led by Photoconsortium, the International Consortium for Photographic Heritage, and represents the latest section of Europeana Collections, a digital library that has previously compiled and organized digital holdings dedicated to music, the arts, and fashion. This new photography section boasts over two million historical images, drawing from museums and photographic archives and agencies  across 43 countries. Contributors include both public and private archives, including Italy’s FratelliAlinari — the world’s oldest photographic agency; Germany’sUnited Archives; Finland’s National Board of Antiquities; the United Kingdom’s TopFoto; and France’s Parisienne de Photographie. Although most of the shared images are under copyright, about one-fifth of them are openly licensed, making for a resource particularly useful to researchers. The photographs include a good number taken in the Philippines in the 19th and early 20th century. Visit www.europeana.eu/portal/en/collections/photography to browse the photos (Hyperallergic.com).

  • Amazing Creature (Woody Sarmiento)

  • Untitled (Shiela Capuchino)

  • Battery Hearn (Macbeth Omega)

  • Street Abangers (Raphael Evan Grabador)

  • Potipot Island (Elena Taeza)

  • Maninisid sa Jones Bridge (Ryan Eduard Benaid)

  • Katay (Ariel A. Gitana)

  • Embracing New Beginnings (Rogelio B. Bejemino Jr.)

  • Dividing the Whole (Angelo Rosales)

  • Catching Alms (Von Yape)

    The Lucie Foundation is accepting submissions from photographers in the early stages of their careers for the 2017 scholarship program in three categories: Photo Taken, Photo Made, and Emerging Artist. Three cash grants are being offered to support the work of emerging photographers—one $2,500 scholarship with an open theme and two $1000 scholarships for photographers working in the fields of Fine Art or Documentary/Photojournalism. Submission deadline is on June 15, 2017.  Requirements for application are: 1) a project proposal; 2) a one-page biography and/or CV; and 3) twenty digital images. Visit www.luciefoundation.org/programs/scholarship/ for more details.

    The Sony World Photography Awards is now open for entries in four competitions. Professional competition has 10 categories to be judged on a body of work. Open competition also has 10 categories rewarding the best single images. Youth competition is for all photographers aged 12-19. And Student Focus aims at students of photography. The Sony World Photography Awards are free to enter. Visit www.worldphoto.org for competition rules and policies.

    And now to our featured readers.

    Macbeth Omega, a mechanical engineer at ICON3D Sustainable Design & BIM Consulting Corp. shares “Battery Hearn,” one of the long-exposure photos he took while on a photography tour in Corregidor Island with the Fotoklase sa Kalye group. He writes about the experience: “We woke up around 2:30 a.m. and we were lucky that we got a clear sky and the moon was already low so we had a very clear view of the Milky Way from the different parts of Corregidor.”

    From working student Von Yape is “Catching Alms,” taken in the Mindoro Roro Port. Von writes that the people in the image dove for the coins that were being tossed by the ship passengers.

    Angelo Rosales, “a 17-year-old boy who loves to record memories through photography” sent in the sunset photo, “Dividing the Whole.” He shares: “Yesterday, I and my friends went to Harbour Square to shoot some sunset scenes and do some landscape shots. The clouds that time were dark gray and the sun was hiding behind. We were a little bit disappointed that we couldn’t capture the sun setting. But at a certain time, almost 6:00 p.m., the golden hour started and we were amazed at the scenery the sun showed. In this photo, I captured the separation of the golden colored sky with those of a little bit dark ones. The output is very astonishing for me. I felt very happy for this. But then the news about the Battle in Marawi City got me covered with sadness and fear. For me, sunset is a proof of a good day and a signal for a much better happening tomorrow. I hope that the people of Marawi can witness their sunset soon and have a peaceful day ahead.”

    Rogelio Bejemino Jr., second engineer at the MT Torm Helvig submitted the sunrise photo, “Embracing New Beginnings.” “Every sunrise symbolizes a new start, a new beginning to embrace,” writes Rogelio. “Bound by many reasons that have become physically distant from our friends and loved ones, we remained connected by the same power under the sun.As long as the sun rises for us, there is hope, there is love, a chance, a new beginning, a gift from above.”

    “Maninisid sa Jones Bridge” comes from Ryan Eduard Benaid,“17- year-old street photographer/visual story teller.”  Ryan shares about his photography: “Sa bawat larawan na kinukuhaan ko ay may kadugtong sa istorya. Ang ‘Maninisid sa Jones Bridge’ ay isang larawan na may magandang istorya. Litratong masasabi kong magiging daan para maging inspirasyon sa iba. Kahit na gaano man kadumi ang tubig, kalugmok ang buhay, kalungkot ang araw, dapat laging may ngiti at saya na dumadaloy sa ating dugo. Subukan nating talunin ang bagay na kinakatakutan natin, labanan ito at sa huli ikaw ay magwawagi. Sa mga kabataang tulad ko, tara magkwento tayo gamit ang litrato.”

    “I call this photo of mine a lucky shot,” writes Shiela Capuchino on her untitled bird photo. “I was stalking this little Olive-Backed Sunbird when it suddenly flew in mid-air. I took the shot and was surprised with the output. It was actually picking a spider web with a tiny spider on it.”

    Woody  Sarmiento  contributed  the macro shot “Amazing Creature.” His photo description reads: “Many people neglect little things surrounding them. But as a photographer, every single bit of these little things is a beauty that naked eyes often failed to see. In this shot, I used my macro lens to magnify my tiny subjects.

    Ariel Gitana sent in the photo titled “Katay.” From Elena Taeza is “Potipot Island.” And the black-and-white “Street Abangers” comes from De La Salle University head coach in swimming, Raphael Evan Grabador.

    Readers may now view issues of Picture Perfect including this column at www.mb.com.ph. For comments, suggestions or just to share an image or idea, email throughalensclearly@yahoo.com or rfyparedes@yahoo.com.

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