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Updated

By Raffy Paredes

  • Untitled (Markttine Coronado)

  • Untitled (Maria Jesselyn Garcia)

  • Madongan Dam (Niji Lacsamana)

  • Willy’s Rock Boracay (Paul Raymond S. Paule)

  • Niño (Philip Am A. Guay)

  • Damili Dance Parade (Myka Renzie Siababa)

  • Sigaw na Panata (Rene Bernal)

  • Untitled (Cris Francisco)

  • Twisted (Jay ann Oblipias Magno)

  • Beautiful Soul (Eduard Yaco)

    Readers into street photography may want to download free e-books on the genre that noted street and documentary photographer Sebastian Jacobitz listed in his article “Street Photography E-Books You Should have Read.” The article with links to the e-books is available on his website https://streetbounty.com/.

    If you’re into creating storyboards but can’t afford the expensive software, Storyboarder is a free, open-source storyboarding software that lets you quickly draw storyboards and turn them into animatics. Can you draw a stick figure? Then you can use Storyboarder. The intuitive interface includes six drawing tools, shot duration, and sections for dialogue, action and notes (nofilmschool.com).

    It’s frustrating to have a clear mental image of something but not be able to exactly get it across in words or a drawing. Now, a team of neuroscientists from the University of Toronto Scarborough has developed a way to digitally recreate exactly the image someone is thinking about, by scanning their brain. The new study was designed to see whether specific images could be plucked out of a person’s mind. To test out the idea, the team hooked people up to electroencephalography (EEG) equipment and then showed them pictures of faces on a computer screen. The EEG system recorded their brain waves, and after running the data through machine learning algorithms, the system was able to digitally recreate the face that the test subject had just seen. “It could provide a means of communication for people who are unable to verbally communicate,” says Adrian Nestor, co-author of the study. “Not only could it produce a neural-based reconstruction of what a person is perceiving, but also of what they remember and imagine, of what they want to express. It could also have forensic uses for law enforcement in gathering eyewitness information on potential suspects rather than relying on verbal descriptions provided to a sketch artist” (newatlas.com).

    National Geographic magazine has concluded that for decades, their coverage was racist. They challenged John Edwin Mason, a professor of African history and the history of photography at the University of Virginia to investigate the history of their own coverage of “people of color” in the U.S.A. and around the world. Now, National Geographic editor-in-chief, Susan Goldberg, admits “our coverage was racist,” and that needs to be acknowledged before they can move forward. Read Goldgerg’s full report on www.nationalgeographic.com (diyphotography.net).

    And now to our featured readers.

    Maria Jesselyn Garcia, currently working as legal staff in a universal bank shares an untitled photo of mangrove plants and rocks amid calm waters. “The photo was taken during my trip in Bohol last February,” she writes. “It was just along the highway of the municipality of Alburquerque and I had to ask our hired driver to stop and chase this wonderful sunset.” Maria Jesselyn discloses that she fell in love with photography when her  world suddenly shut down. “Photography opened my eyes to the wonderful beauty of this world. It made me realized that beauty doesn’t mean focusing on just one angle. A beauty of a subject depends on the right angular perspective given to it in order for its beauty to shine.”

    From senior high school student Cris Francisco is an untitled photo of the sunset at sea. “I just want to share one of my favorite seascapes so far,” writes Cris. “This awesome place reminds me of my childhood days. The place is quite calm. Away from noisy people and very basking.”

    The portrait photo, “Beautiful Soul,” comes from Eduard Yaco. He captured this portrait of an old Mangyan during his documentary and photojournalism summer workshop for the students of Puerto Galera in 2016. “This shot was taken at the Mangyan Village in Talipanan, Puerto Galera,” Eduard recalls.” Upon guiding and mentoring the students, I saw this old lady welcoming us to their place. I couldn’t let the moment pass without capturing her beautiful face. It reminded me of one line in the song ‘Another Day in Paradise’ by Phil Collins: ‘You can tell from the lines on her face, you can see that she’s been there’. I can’t remember her exact name because I lost my notes, but I always remember her beautiful face and soul.”

    Jay ann Magno sent in “Twisted,” a photo of pole dancers. She shares: “Aside from being a nature lover, I also love arts. I keep on taking photos of the performances as I consider them as art works. This photo was taken during an International Dance Day in Manila. Pole dancing is very interesting and this one is a great subject for me.”

    Myka Renzie Siababa contributed the photo titled “Damili Dance Parade.” She took the photo during the Damili Festival in San Nicolas, Ilocos Norte. The festival pays tribute to the ancient craft of terra-cotta pottery or ‘damili’ through a month-long celebration of dances, exhibits, sport competitions, and showcase of talents. She reports: “The festival is celebrated every month of December showing thanksgiving for all the blessings received for the whole year. The Damili Dance Parade is one of the anticipated activities for the residents of San Nicolas. People from other towns visit the municipality to watch the astonishing and colorful dance parade. The groups of the students danced gracefully as they demonstrated the process of ‘damili,’ while an Ilocano song, ‘Taga-San Nicolas Kami’, was played.”

    The photo, “Niño” is from Philip Am Guay. His description reads: A child wearing a Sto. Niño outfit enjoys playing in the rain just outside the Basilica. Philip is one of the founders/admins of the Cebu Mobile Shutterbugs (CMS), a dynamic community dedicated for mobile photography enthusiasts based in Cebu City.

    Niji Lacsamana submitted the black-and-white photo of Madongan Dam located in Dingras, Ilocos Norte. Paul Raymond Paule sent in “Willy’s Rock Boracay.” From Rene Bernal is a different take on the Nazareno procession combining history and religiosity with “Sigaw na Panata.” And the untitled photo of a happy young girl performing in a fiesta dance parade comes from Markttine Coronado.

    Readers may now view issues of Picture Perfect including this column at www.mb.com.ph. For comments, suggestions or just to share an image or idea, email throughalensclearly@yahoo.com or rfyparedes@yahoo.com.

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