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The Song of Our Vanishing Animals

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The Philippines is one of the 17 mega bio-diverse countries in the world, containing two-thirds of the Earth’s biodiversity and 70 percent of the world’s plants and animal species. Apparently, we, Filipinos might lose endemic animals that are now critically endangered.

 

The Philippine Eagle  | Pithecophaga jefferyi

Philippine-eagle

Endemic: Luzon, Samar, Leyte, and Mindanao

Threats to Survival:  Shooting, Trapping, and Deforestation

Facts: 

  • Also known as a monkey – eating eagle.
  • It takes six to seven years for the young eagles to be sexually mature.
  • Breeding season is from July to February.
  • An estimated population of only 400 pairs remains in the wild

 

 

Tamaraw | Bubalus mindorensis

Photo courtesy | wikipedia

                                                     Photo courtesy | wikipedia

Endemic: Mindoro

Threats to Survival: Deforestation, Hunting

Facts: 

  • Also known as Mindoro dwarf buffalo
  • Breeding season is from June to November.
  • An estimated population of only 413 individuals remains in the wild.

 

 

The Philippine Tarsier | Carlito syrichta

Philippine-Tarsier,-Manila-

                                                                      Photo courtesy | wikipedia

Endemic:  Bohol, Samar, Leyte, and Mindanao

Threats to Survival:  Deforestation, Hunting

Facts: 

  • Also known as mawumagin Cebuano
  • Theirs is among the slowest fetal growth rates of any mammal, taking six months to reach a birth weight of 23 grams.
  • They have one baby per year (two babies per year is possible but seldom).
  • An estimated population of 5,000 to 10,000 remains in the wild.

 

 

 

Mindoro Bleeding-Heart | Gallicolumba platenae

Mindoro-Bleeding-Heart-(Wik

                                             Photo courtesy | wikipedia

Endemic:  solely found on the island of Mindoro

Threats to Survival:   Deforestation, Hunting

Facts:

  • Also known as puñalada in Mindoro
  • This bird is medium-sized and short-tailed with a distinct small, bright orange central patch to otherwise white underparts, hence the name Bleeding Heart.
  • An estimated population of 50 to 249remains in the wild.

 

 

 

Red Vented Cockatoo | Cacatua haematuropygia

Photo courtesy | wikipedia

                                                Photo courtesy | wikipedia

Endemic:  Palawan

Threats to Survival:   Deforestation, Poaching

Facts: 

  • Also known as Katala, Kalangay, Abukay, or Agay in Palawan
  • The Philippine cockatoo is a noisy bird that makes a sound that is almost deafening when several birds are calling simultaneously
  • Mating season is from March to July.
  • An estimated population of 430-750remains in the wild.

 

 

 

The Philippine Forest Turtle | Cacatua haematuropygia

Philippine-Forest-Turtle-(W

                                                Photo courtesy | wikipedia

Endemic:  Leyte and Palawan

Threats to Survival:   Poaching

Facts: 

  • A fresh water endemic turtle
  • This turtle has ginkgo-shaped vertebral scutes and a pale white to yellow line across its head behind ears and nickname as “bowtie turtle.”

 

 

The Philippine Mouse Deer  | Tragulus nigricans

Philippine-Mouse-Deer-(Wiki

                                                            Photo courtesy | Wikipedia – Kluas Rudloff

Endemic:  Palawan

Threats to Survival:   Deforestation, Hunting

Facts: 

  • Also known as Balabac chevrotain or pilandok  in Palawan
  • This mammal is nocturnal and  generally timid  when being watched
  • It takes five months for the young mouse deer to be sexually mature.

 

 

 

The Philippine Naked-Backed Fruit Bat |  Dobsonia chapmani

Naked-Backed-Fruit-Bat

Endemic: Cebu and Negros

Threats to Survival:   Guano Mining, Poaching

Facts:   

  • Largest cave-roosting bat in Philippines
  • The naked-backed fruit bat got its name on account of its wings attached to the midline of its back.
  • The Philippine naked-back fruit bats give birth in May or June and young are able to fly around August or September.

 

 

 

Visayan Warty Pig  | Sus cebifrons

Photo courtesy |wikipedia

                                                                         Photo courtesy | wikipedia

Endemic:   Cebu

Threats to Survival:   Deforestation, Hunting

Facts:  

  • Also known as Baboy Ramo
  • Average number of piglets per litter in the wild is three or four
  • Piglets are usually born in January, February, or March.
  • Females reach sexual maturity at two or three years of age, although captive individuals have conceived at 12 months of age.

 

 

 

The Philippine Eagle-Owl  |  Bubo philippensis 

Photo courtesy | wikipedia

                             Photo courtesy | wikipedia

Endemic:  Catanduanes, Samar, Bohol, Mindanao, Luzon, Leyte

Threats to Survival:   Deforestation, Hunting

Facts: 

  • Also known as kuwago  or bukao in Palawan
  • Endemic only to the Philippines, the Philippine Eagle-Owl (Bubo philippensis) is one of the largest species of owls in the world.
  • It is currently under vulnerable status, its numbers continually decreasing.

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